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Posts Tagged ‘nature’

I have two #ThingsILike today, because I couldn’t choose between them. All I can say is wow!

‘When People Can See Time’: Photographer Captures Day, Night In One Image

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This is the only time of the year if the conditions are just right for the sunset to create this amazing waterfall of fire in Yosemite. We challenge you to go chase this waterfall. ••••• Thank you to Jeff @jeffreyplui for the wonderful moment. ・・・ "I Lava You" – Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, CA. Each year during the second half of February, if there's enough snowpack atop El Capitan, if the temperature's warm enough to produce enough snowmelt, if the western skies are clear, and if the setting sun hits the water and spray at just the right angle, the natural phenomenon of Firefall occurs. We arrived at the park late in the afternoon this past Saturday and found a parking spot along Southside Dr. halfway between Cathedral and Sentinel beaches just as the orange glow was beginning. The place was absolutely packed for this rare show, but I found a tiny opening and wedged myself between a photographer and a tourist. Squatting on wet, slippery ice with the photographer's backside a few inches from my grill, I managed to get this shot of Firefall at its peak glow. ______________________________ Nikon D7100, Nikon 28-300. 125mm, f/14, 1/5 sec, ISO 100. Lightroom & IG. ______________________________ #firefall #yosemitenationalpark #yosemite_national_park #yosemitenation #findyourpark #nationalparkgeek #horsetailfalls #wildcalifornia ​​#rawcalifornia #visitcalifornia #californiaholics​ #ignorcal #westcoast_exposures #ig_waterfalls #hotshotz_water #aqua_gallery​ ​#water_brilliance #water_perfection #igworldclub_h2o #exclusive_water #water_shots #water_captures #ig_northamerica #igs_america #ig_all_americas #bw_beautifulworld #just_unitedstates #ic_february #multi_180216 ————————————- #nationalparkgeek

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Erik Wernquist’s lovely short film “Wanderers” is making the rounds online, and deservedly so. The piece uses dramatic visualizations of our solar system and is narrated with audio excerpts from Carl Sagan’s book Pale Blue Dot. If you have four minutes and a yen for optimistic futurism, let this film help you imagine humanity’s future on the open road, “out there.” And it’s always good to hear Carl Sagan.

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When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.
— John Muir
This video from Sustainable Human is a fascinating look at the impact of an apex predator species on not just an area’s wildlife, but its ecology and even geography. As this article at Nature.com discusses, such trophic cascades can have far-reaching impacts:
When the impact of a predator on its prey’s ecology trickles down one more feeding level to affect the density and/or behavior of the prey’s prey, ecologists term this interaction a feeding, or trophic cascade…
Interesting information, both for denizens of Planet Earth and creators of other worlds as well.

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Had fun fishing. Thought up lots of story ideas while trolling the lake. Did not fall in.

Non-typical wildlife observed on this trip:
— a black bear galloping across the road
— loons and loon chicks
— Merganser ducks
— one heron, Great
— two Trumpeter swans and their four signets
— deer, grazing
— a fox, sprinting
— lake trout, swimming
— terns and/or gulls, I can’t tell them apart
— a bald eagle nest, but the parents were away and the chick was having a bit of a snooze

Also, I learned that reeling in 550 feet of steel fishing line takes ages and is not for the weak of arm!

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Literally. Time in the great outdoors will be good for all sorts of reasons, and we’ve even had reports of bald eagles nesting near the fishing spot. Have a great weekend!

 

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Beauty

Oh look, it’s snowing again, and I realize that I’m on the edge of what I’m calling Snow-Related Stockholm Syndrome. When I start to enjoy the fact that I’m buried under feet of the white stuff, it’s time for a change of scenery. Today, I give you Zion National Park.

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Busy, busy today, but I don’t want you to miss this photo from Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin:

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For the first time in five years, the ice on Lake Superior is thick enough to visit the spectacular sea caves of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in #Wisconsin. Inside the caves awaits a fairyland of needlelike icicles. The formations change from chamber to chamber and from day to day. Apostle Islands is experiencing high volume of visitors right now, so we recommend that you visit the caves during the week. Before heading to the caves, please call the Ice Line at (715) 779-3397 – extension 3, for the most current ice condition information. Photo: National Park Service #apostleislands #lakeshore #caves #icecaves #lakesuperior #greatlakes #lakes #winter #icicles #ice #nature #naturelovers #scenic #beauty #breathtaking #instagood #instacool #instawow #instamood #like #love #bestoftheday #photooftheday #nofilter publiclands #travel

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Wow. Just, wow. And unlike the Fairyland they resemble, anyone can visit these caves. Enjoy!

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[written from The Bush, as they say]
Greetings from Northern Ontario, where I sit at a table in a cottage overlooking a broad grey lake. Most mornings the lake sits still and calm, its surface and the encircling hills a chalice in which to hold mist. Like so many others in this region, this lake is surrounded by birch and pine, underpinned by the heavy, flat bedrock of the Canadian Shield. A small grassy lawn surrounds the house, illuminated by daisies and orange hawkweed.

It’s beautiful here, in the stark, almost frantic way of northern climes in summer. The sky warms around five o’clock in the morning and doesn’t fade until almost ten at night. Local wildlife takes full advantage of the long days, and I try to do the same.

Speaking of local wildlife, in addition to the usual chipmunks, rabbits, hawks, etc. I have seen the following in northern Ontario:

  • tortoises (tortii?)
  • loons
  • beaver
  • elk (ok, just tracks, but still)
  • hummingbirds (brave little adventurers from the southern reaches of the continent)
  • wolves (including one gorgeous specimen with russet fur)
  • deer, a.k.a. walking wolf lunchies
  • moose, female or juvenile male, large (hey, it’s a moose)
  • mosquitoes (forget cicadas, these monsters should be the next major food group)
  • It’s raining now, providing me with the perfect reason to stay in and keep working. But even work is better in the woods!

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