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Posts Tagged ‘music’

In my quest to prove that the internet is good for more than trolling, discouraging news and ridiculous conspiracy theories, I give you Typatone.

The act of writing has always been an art. Now, it can also be an act of music. Each letter you type corresponds to a specific musical note putting a new spin on your composition. Make music while you write.

Hello world!

Type directly or use the clipboard icon to paste text. Toggle the music icon to change styles. Click the plus sign to start anew.

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What is the sound of one drabble singing?

This.

And here’s the opening of Pride and Prejudice while we’re at it.

Delightful!

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Photo by Luke Leung on Unsplash

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As a bonus Father’s Day gift, today I’m featuring a podcast I know he’ll like.

A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs 

In it, Andrew Hickey discusses the history and culture of rock & roll as seen through 500 songs. He’s up to episode 150.

If you prefer to consume your media via the written word, each episode includes a transcript. I also found myself somewhat at a loss as to which, what and where, so (being me) I made an episode list with links. (If an index already exists, I didn’t see it.)

Note: I built the list by translating episode titles into URLs in Excel and haven’t tested every link, but hopefully they’ll get you to where you’re going.

Enjoy!

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A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs 
Episode 1: “Flying Home” by the Benny Goodman Sextet
Episode 2: “Roll ‘Em Pete” by Big Joe Turner and Pete Johnson
Episode 3: “Ida Red” by Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys
Episode 4: “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie” by Louis Jordan
Episode 5: ‘Rosetta Tharpe and “This Train”
Episode 6: ‘The Ink Spots — “That’s When Your Heartaches Begin”
Episode 7: ‘Wynonie Harris and “Good Rockin’ Tonight”
Episode 8: “The Fat Man” by Fats Domino
Episode 9: “How High The Moon” by Les Paul and Mary Ford
Episode 10: “Double Crossin’ Blues”, by Johnny Otis, Little Esther, and the Robins
Episode 11: “Rocket 88” by Jackie Brenston and the Delta Cats
Episode 12: “Lawdy Miss Clawdy” by Lloyd Price
Episode 13: “Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean” by Ruth Brown
Episode 14: ″Jambalaya” by Hank Williams
Episode 15: “Hound Dog” by Big Mama Thornton
Episode 16: “Crazy Man Crazy” by Bill Haley and the Comets
Episode 17: “Money Honey” by Clyde McPhatter and the Drifters
Episode 18: “Sh-Boom” by the Chords
Episode 19: “That’s All Right, Mama” by Elvis Presley
Episode 20: “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and the Comets
Episode 21: “Rock Island Line” by Lonnie Donegan
Episode 22: “The Wallflower” by Etta James
Episode 23: “Pledging My Love” by Johnny Ace
Episode 24: “Ko Ko Mo” by Gene and Eunice
Episode 25: “Earth Angel” by the Penguins
Episode 26: “Ain’t That A Shame” by Fats Domino
Episode 27: “Tweedle Dee” by LaVern Baker
Episode 28: “Sincerely” by the Moonglows
Episode 29: “Maybellene” by Chuck Berry
Episode 30: “Bo Diddley” by Bo Diddley
Episode 31: “Only You” by the Platters
Episode 32: “I Got A Woman” by Ray Charles
Episode 33: “Mystery Train”, by Elvis Presley
Episode 34: “Tutti Frutti” by Little Richard
Episode 35: “Why Do Fools Fall In Love?” by Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers
Episode 36: “Blue Suede Shoes” by Carl Perkins
Episode 37: “I Walk The Line” by Johnny Cash
Episode 38: “Heartbreak Hotel” by Elvis Presley
Episode 39: “Please Please Please” by James Brown and the Famous Flames
Episode 40: “Drugstore Rock ‘n’ Roll” by Janis Martin
Episode 41: “Be-Bop-A-Lula” by Gene Vincent and the Bluecaps
Episode 42: “Ooby Dooby” by Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings
Episode 43: “I Gotta Know” by Wanda Jackson
Episode 44: “Train Kept A-Rollin’”, by Johnny Burnette and the Rock ‘n’ Roll Trio
Episode 45: “Blueberry Hill”, by Fats Domino
Episode 46: “Brown-Eyed Handsome Man” by Chuck Berry
Episode 47: “Goodnight My Love” by Jesse Belvin
Episode 48: “Rock With the Caveman” by Tommy Steele
Episode 49: “Love is Strange” by Mickey and Sylvia
Episode 50: “Honky Tonk” by Bill Doggett
Episode 51: “Matchbox” by Carl Perkins
Episode 52: “Twenty Flight Rock”, by Eddie Cochran
Episode 53: “I Put a Spell on You” by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins
Episode 54: “Keep A Knockin’” by Little Richard
Episode 55: “Searchin’” by the Coasters
Episode 56: “Bye Bye Love” by the Everly Brothers
Episode 57: “Flying Saucers Rock ‘n’ Roll” by Billy Lee Riley and the Little Green Men
Episode 58: “Mr. Lee” by the Bobbettes
Episode 59: “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” by Jerry Lee Lewis
Episode 60: “You Send Me” by Sam Cooke
Episode 61: “That’ll Be the Day” by The Crickets
Episode 62: “Jailhouse Rock” by Elvis Presley
Episode 63: “Susie Q” by Dale Hawkins
Episode 64: “Reet Petite” by Jackie Wilson
Episode 65: “Maybe” by the Chantels
Episode 66: “Great Balls of Fire” by Jerry Lee Lewis
Episode 67: “Johnny B. Goode”, by Chuck Berry
Episode 68: “Yakety Yak” by the Coasters
Episode 69: “Fujiyama Mama” by Wanda Jackson
Episode 70: “Move It” by Cliff Richard and the Drifters
Episode 71: “Willie and the Hand Jive” by Johnny Otis
Episode 72: “Trouble” by Elvis Presley
Episode 73: “La Bamba” by Ritchie Valens
Episode 74: “It Doesn’t Matter Any More” by Buddy Holly
Episode 75: “There Goes My Baby” by the Drifters
Episode 76: “Stagger Lee” by Lloyd Price
Episode 77: “Brand New Cadillac” by Vince Taylor and the Playboys
Episode 78: “What’d I Say” by Ray Charles
Episode 79: “Sweet Nothin’s” by Brenda Lee
Episode 80: “Money” by Barrett Strong
Episode 81: “Shout” by the Isley Brothers
Episode 82: “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” by Elvis Presley
Episode 83: “Only The Lonely” by Roy Orbison
Episode 84: “Shakin’ All Over” by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates
Episode 85: “Three Steps to Heaven” by Eddie Cochran
Episode 86: “LSD-25” by the Gamblers
Episode 87: “Apache” by the Shadows
Episode 88: “Cathy’s Clown” by the Everly Brothers
Episode 89: “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” by the Shirelles
Episode 90: “Runaway” by Del Shannon
Episode 91: “The Twist” by Chubby Checker
Episode 92: “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” by the Tokens
Episode 93: “Please Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes
Episode 94: “Stand By Me”, by Ben E. King
Episode 95: “You Better Move On” by Arthur Alexander
Episode 96: “The Loco-Motion” by Little Eva
Episode 97: “Song to Woody” by Bob Dylan
Episode 98: “I’ve Just Fallen For Someone” by Adam Faith
Episode 99: “Surfin’ Safari” by the Beach Boys
Episode 100: “Love Me Do” by the Beatles
Episode 101: “Telstar” by the Tornados
Episode 102: “Twist and Shout” by the Isley Brothers
Episode 103: “Hitch-Hike” by Marvin Gaye
Episode 104: “He’s a Rebel” by “The Crystals”
Episode 105: “Green Onions” by Booker T. and the MGs
Episode 106: “Louie Louie” by the Kingsmen
Episode 107: “Surf City” by Jan and Dean
Episode 108: “I Wanna Be Your Man” by the Rolling Stones
Episode 109: “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Peter, Paul, and Mary
Episode 110: “Be My Baby” by the Ronettes
Episode 111: “Heat Wave” by Martha and the Vandellas
Episode 112: “She Loves You” by The Beatles
Episode 113: “Needles and Pins” by The Searchers
Episode 114: “My Boy Lollipop” by Millie
Episode 115: “House of the Rising Sun” by the Animals
Episode 116: “Where Did Our Love Go?” by The Supremes
Episode 117: “Don’t Worry Baby” by the Beach Boys
Episode 118: “Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy” by Manfred Mann
Episode 119: “You Really Got Me” by the Kinks
Episode 120: “A Hard Day’s Night” by the Beatles
Episode 121: “The Leader of the Pack” by the Shangri-Las
Episode 122: “A Change is Gonna Come” by Sam Cooke
Episode 123: “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’” by the Righteous Brothers
Episode 124: “People Get Ready” by the Impressions
Episode 125: “Here Comes the Night” by Them
Episode 126: “For Your Love” by the Yardbirds
Episode 127: “Ticket to Ride” by the Beatles
Episode 128: “Mr. Tambourine Man” by the Byrds
Episode 129: “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” by the Rolling Stones
Episode 130: “Like a Rolling Stone” by Bob Dylan
Episode 131: “I Hear a Symphony” by the Supremes
Episode 132: “I Can’t Help Myself” by the Four Tops
Episode 133: “My Girl” by the Temptations
Episode 134: “In the Midnight Hour” by Wilson Pickett
Episode 135: “The Sound of Silence” by Simon and Garfunkel
Episode 136: “My Generation” by the Who
Episode 137: “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag” by James Brown
Episode 138: “I Fought the Law” by the Bobby Fuller Four
Episode 139: “Eight Miles High” by the Byrds
Episode 140: “Trouble Every Day” by the Mothers of Invention
Episode 141: “River Deep, Mountain High” by Ike and Tina Turner
Episode 142: “God Only Knows” by the Beach Boys
Episode 143: “Summer in the City” by the Lovin’ Spoonful
Episode 144: “Last Train to Clarksville” by the Monkees
Episode 145: “Tomorrow Never Knows” by the Beatles
Episode 146: “Good Vibrations” by the Beach Boys
Episode 147: “Hey Joe” by The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Episode 148: “Light My Fire” by the Doors
Episode 149: “Respect” by Aretha Franklin
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles – A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs

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Photo by Il Vagabiondo on Unsplash

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There is a lot of trouble in the world right now, but we are not helpless. We are not hopeless. And if there’s any better way to remember that today than Star Wars, I don’t know it. Just thinking of the theme song raises my spirits. Here’s to building a better future. 

For motivation, check out this piece on the history of John Williams’ rousing theme:

Behind The Song: “Star Wars Theme” by John Williams – American Songwriter

And then, of course, there’s our scrappy band of Rebels.

“Would it help if I got out and pushed?”

— Princess Leia

Always.

May the Force be with us.

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via Pixabay 

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I am partial to the written word, of course, but there are times when words can fail us. That’s where music comes in.

Ukrainian violinist Illia Bondarenko made a recording of himself playing in a shelter in Kyiv. Since posting, he has been joined by musicians around the world…

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Do you play? You can join in by downloading the score and making your own recording:

Violinists Support Ukraine – Participate

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Original Photo by Beth Rufener on Unsplash

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My father is not into Wordle. I’ll admit that I was a little surprised to learn that the man who helped teach me to read, let us bring books to the dinner table (and anywhere else), and encouraged my every literary step looked at Wordle and said, “Meh, I’m just not that into you.”

But hey, that’s cool. To each their own, right? And today I found something that music lovers like him might prefer.

Meet Heardle – That daily musical intros game.

The answer library appears to draw mostly/exclusively from popular music so it may not be my father’s thing (a classical version would be perfect), but it’s fun to see people pushing the original idea out into other, equally creative spaces.

Speaking of spaces, geography nerds can also check out Worldle. Guess the country from a map outline and clues that hint at distance and direction.

Creative and fun!

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Photo by blocks on Unsplash

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Today is (probably*) Ludwig van Beethoven’s birthday, and it’s a date I note every year. That’s because it also happens to be my adoption date. 

Like a lot of kids, mini me went through an early phase where I pronounced new words as they were spelled (like “Zay oose,” here’s hoping no Greek gods were paying attention). And so in some corner of my mind this German composer will always remain “Bee Thoven.”

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The 20 greatest Beethoven works of all time – Classic FM

Here’s where I admit that I find a lot of his work a little over the top, like he was angry at the piano or something. As my stepmother has been known to say, “Too many notes!” I still recognize brilliance when I hear it, and his approach is a lesson for creatives of all forms.

“To play a wrong note is insignificant; to play without passion is inexcusable.”

― Ludwig van Beethoven

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Bring me my piano! Photo by Maria Lupan on Unsplash

* Beethoven was baptized on December 17th in Bonn, Germany, making it likely that he was born the day before. Let’s just go with it, shall we?

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Some days you take a break from the avalanche of news and realize you’ve got Joni Mitchell’s Big Yellow Taxi stuck in your head. The chorus can feel too true to remember that there are reasons to be cheerful and the world is not, in fact, on a one way trip to Ugh Town. 

But other days? Like today days? With heartfelt respect to Ms. Mitchell,* you realize that the final lines of the song could be rewritten:

“They saved Paradise,

and took out the parking lot.”

And we’re just the people to do it.

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Photo by Bernard Hermant on Unsplash
  • How does one address someone with this level of accomplishment? Award-winner? Multi-Hall of Famer? Fellow Canadian? Doctor (she has three honorary doctorates)? I went with the title that, I hope, conveys fundamental respect across all arenas.

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Today in creative women, we have two items you might find interesting. First, a podcast on one of our great science fiction writers: 

Octavia Butler: Visionary Fiction

Octavia Butler’s alternate realities and ‘speculative fiction’ reveal striking, and often devastating parallels to the world we live in today. She was a deep observer of the human condition, perplexed and inspired by our propensity towards self-destruction. Butler was also fascinated by the cyclical nature of history, and often looked to the past when writing about the future. Along with her warning is her message of hope – a hope conjured by centuries of survival and persistence. For every society that perishes in her books comes a story of rebuilding, of repair.

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I was also interested to see this piece on largely forgotten female composers, complete with interactive map. I’m not a classical music buff, but I didn’t even know Amadeus had a sister, much less one who was also a child music prodigy. Now I do, and I’m better for it.

‘They deserve a place in history’: music teacher makes map of female composers

Two siblings, both considered child prodigies, dazzled audiences across Europe together in the 18th century, leaving a trail of positive reviews in their wake. But while Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart went on to be celebrated as one of the world’s greatest composers, the accomplishments of his sister – Maria Anna – were quickly forgotten after she was forced to halt her career when she came of age.

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Here’s to not stopping.

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Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash

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Not Fade Away

My father started a friends and family email chain about An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, a window on a history that is both important and difficult. For a bit of balance, here are indigenous students doing something that is both important and uplifting.

Here’s to survival, and to hope.

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Students at Allison Bernard Memorial High School in Cape Breton sing Paul McCartney’s Blackbird in their native Mi’kmaq language.

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Saturday mornings always remind me of cartoons and classical music.

We didn’t have a television when I was growing up (or junk food like sugary cereals), which was great for reading and not quite so great for social integration. (This was before there was a smartphone in every pocket, terabytes of entertainment at every turn, and the splintering of society. But I digress.) 

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I did manage to absorb a decent amount of after-school programming and advertising jingles at friends’ houses, and Saturday morning cartoons when we visited our grandparents.

They had a cute little house in Chicago, with a TV room in the back. That’s where I slept when we visited, and I loved it because it meant I could wake up early and start the day with a deliciously sweet diet of cartoons. My brother would join me soon after, and we’d watch until the rest of the house was up. 

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Most Saturdays, though, we’d wake up at home. What those experiences had in common was classical music. Cartoons have used classical scores for decades. My father is a big fan, and likes to start the day with classical music, played loud. Especially on Saturdays. One of the first albums he bought us as kids was Peter and the Wolf.

To this day, I can’t hear that Prokofiev tune without smiling.

I wasn’t the only one indoctrinated by the classical/cartoon connection, of course. Many of you were right there with me. Click through for a fun thread that identifies a number of the more recognizable pieces.

Or perhaps you are looking for a 2+ hour collection of cartoon music? Then this is your lucky day!

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Since I’m thinking of my father and music, here’s a link I think he might enjoy:

I have no idea what most of these shows were (United States Steel Hour?), but I hope that he does, and that some of this music brings a smile to his face, too.

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Happy Saturday!

Photo by Any Lane on Pexels.com

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