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Posts Tagged ‘STEM’

What am I doing this fine Saturday morning? Why, playing with Google’s newest entry into the Made with Code catalog, Coding with Wonder Woman.

Made with Code is Google’s push to keep girls and women active in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Girls are awesome. Sci-tech is awesome. Together, they make an awesome sandwich.

Of course, boys are awesome too (hello, most excellent nephew!), but they aren’t facing this less-than-awesome prospect:

Yeah, that’s just… no. We can do better. If we’re going to tackle the long and growing list of environmental, social and technical challenges in the world, we need everyone’s brain parts. And not in a night of the undead hunger sort of a way.

There are a lot of intro to coding resources on the web, but this one is fun, free and lets you fight bad guys with a magic lasso and a big-bad sword. So girl or boy, man or woman, child, teacher, parent or otherwise curious mind, if coding looks like fun but you don’t know where to start, this may be the game for you.

(Haven’t seen the movie? Recommended!)

 

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Or, what I read with my morning tea. Entertainment, edification, and associated weirdness? Yep, these articles have it all. Enjoy!

And via the good people at io9:

 

 

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This article by scientist Pascal Lee has a great point: reading helps kids turn dreams into reality. I just have one tiny bone to pick, and that has to do with the non/fiction divide:

“Let’s get ready for Mission: Mars and take our kids with us. Let’s start them on this journey with a non-fiction STEM book.”

I absolutely agree that Science, Technology, Engineering and Math learning and advancement requires books of the non-fiction variety. That’s right, actual facts are actually important. No question. I would add, though, that not only is it not bad if Generation Mars includes fiction on its reading list, doing so will help them with that first bit: having dreams. It’s also important to remember that much of the best science fiction is based on extrapolated science fact.*

“The best way to predict the future is to create it yourself.”
— Peter Diamandis

As Lee points out, Scholastic’s “Read Every Day. Lead a Better Life” motto is right on target, but why limit that reading? Non-fiction shows you how to build the path, fiction helps you decide where you want to go and imagine what it will be like when you get there.

I can’t wait to see where Generation Mars takes us.

* While “top X” lists are always arguable, they can be a great place to start. Check out this list of The Best Hard Science Fiction Books of all Time: Ten titles that inspired Technology Review to publish TRSF, its own collection of sci-fi stories.

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